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Wednesday, August 1
 

11:00am

Learning Creative Learning: How We Keep Tinkering With MOOCs
Learning Creative Learning (LCL) is a free online course designed to share principles and strategies on how to engage people in creative learning experiences, i.e. working on projects that they are passionate about, in collaboration with peers, within a playful environment that encourages experimentation. Although LCL is organized and presented as a six-week online course, its ultimate goal is to cultivate an ongoing learning community in support of creative learning around the world. Through our two past edition of the course in 2013 and 2014, we identified three design tensions to achieve this goal: offering a course while developing a community, supporting multiple pathways into a shared experience, and supporting both local and global communities. This spotlight presentation describes the design choices that we made in the latest edition, as a way to negotiate those tensions. In addition, we share some ideas for future directions.

Speakers
LG

Lily Gabaree

Learning Experience Designer, MIT Media Lab
YM

Yumiko Murai

Postdoctoral Associate, MIT
CP

Carmelo Presicce

MIT Media Lab
avatar for Moran Tsur

Moran Tsur

Learning Developer, BrainPOP


Wednesday August 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Whitaker College, E25-111 Classroom, Building E25 45 Carleton St Cambridge, MA 02142

11:00am

The Aquarius Project: Using Narrative and Hands on Science to Drive Youth Innovation
It often takes more than the right tech to activate authentic youth engagement with science exploration. Through “The Aquarius Project,” brand new makers found the inspiration to engage in hands on science by joining a story bigger than themselves.

Months ago, a sonic boom shook the residents of the Midwest. A meteor traveling at 38,000 miles an hour entered our atmosphere and exploded with a force equal to 10 tons of dynamite. Weather radar spotted the end of its journey as it splashed down into Lake Michigan. There is little known about the lake bottom in this region. It is this combination of knowns and unknowns that has inspired high school students and science professionals from across Chicago to mount, “The Aquarius Project.” This multidisciplinary endeavor is the first student driven attempt at underwater meteorite retrieval.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Bresky

Chris Bresky

Teen Programs Manager, Adler Planetarium
Chris Bresky is a trained artist and educator who currently works at the Adler Planetarium finding creative ways for the public to engage with science. He is interested in using story and narrative to inspire exploration. He has been awarded the Jon Lipsky Award for Excellence in... Read More →


Wednesday August 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

11:00am

Voyage: A Collaborative Classroom-Scale Virtual Reality Experience
Voyage is about using collaborative mobile VR to bring a virtual field trip to the classroom. We talk about our process in designing a multiplayer, educational, VR experience, the questions we were trying to solve and lessons that we learned from building it.

Speakers
NK

Na-yeon Kim

Graduate Student, Entertainment Technology Center, Carnegie Mellon University


Wednesday August 1, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
MIT Tang Center, E51-372 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

11:30am

Let’s Challenge how we Think VR 360°Videos in Education
360-videos resemble traditional videography in some of their affordances but are still genuinely different when it comes to innovative storytelling, playful learning elements or strategies for directing the gaze-attention of learners. At our New Media Lab, we are currently developing six innovative 360-videos, following a process of co-design in multidisciplinary teams of teachers, learning experience designers, media designers and researchers. The projects cover a variety of educational topics including remote sensing, dementia, lab security, archaeology, classroom conflict management and a critical meta-media inquiry into VR. All VR-videos have different learning goals, such as promoting problem solving skills, identifying important signals, finding cues in a new environment and experiencing consequences of actions and wrong choices. We will explain our design decisions, incorporating both the media affordances and educational perspective, discuss our successes and failures of the 360-video pilot and elaborate on aspects such as kinaesthetic movements, interactivity, affordances, framing and guidance.

Speakers
avatar for Jeanine Reutemann

Jeanine Reutemann

Researcher, Leiden University, New Media Lab, Centre for Innovation
Jeanine Reutemann is a (Audiovisual) Researcher at the Centre for Innovation at the Leiden University, with a background in film, education and media sciences. Main research interests: Science, Education & Film, MOOCs, VR, AI & Film, Digital Education, Embodiment Theory, Gesture Studies... Read More →


Wednesday August 1, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-372 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

11:30am

Localized! Leveraging Global and Local Data Sets to Build a Statewide System for Connected Climate Learning
This session will report on a work-in-process to create a system of technology-enabled, data-rich, localized climate learning experiences. Since 2005, the Gulf of Maine Research Institute has brought ~70% of Maine’s 5th/6th grade cohort annually to our marine research lab for a 2.5-hour exploration of ecosystem complexity. We are now renovating the program’s technology and learning experiences to combine global data sets (sea surface temperature), local data sets (lobster landings), and multitaction technology to enable students to investigate the impacts of climate change in the Gulf of Maine. By completion of the project, we will have extended this informal learning experience through connected learning experiences in the classroom, in regional science centers, in public libraries, and through teacher professional development. A digital Field Notebook enables assembly of student-created assets from across these environments, as well as from experiences chosen by students themselves.

Speakers
avatar for Leigh Peake

Leigh Peake

Chief Education Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
GMRI is focused at the intersection of informal and formal learning, working primarily in the spaces of data literacy and climate literacy. Our two statewide programs include a citizen science program and a data-rich, tech-enabled informal science learning experience. Talk to me about... Read More →


Wednesday August 1, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

11:30am

Open Learning ’17 and ’18: Connected Learning As Professional Development
This presentation spotlights the origin and development of the “Open Learning” connectivist MOOCs offered in 2017 and 2018. The project began as a Faculty Collaboratives initiative, sponsored by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, with project administration supplied by the State Council for Higher Education in Virginia (SCHEV) The project sought to create sustainable networks for professional development related to the AAC&U’s “Liberal Education and America’s Promise” (LEAP) signature program. We tell the story of designing and implementing Open Learning ’17 and ’18, highlight lessons learned, and encourage discussion of how national organizations, state government, and both private and public institutions of higher learning might work together to create connected learning platforms for professional development. The designers knew that merely reading about open learning would not effect change. To understand connected learning, one must practice connected learning.

Speakers
avatar for Gardner Campbell

Gardner Campbell

Assoc.Prof. of English, Virginia Commonwealth University
avatar for Susan Erickson

Susan Erickson

Library Director, Virginia Wesleyan University
I've been on the Steering Committee for the OpenLearning '17 and OpenLearning '18 cMOOCs. For more info, go to the hub site: http://openlearninghub.net/


Wednesday August 1, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Whitaker College, E25-111 Classroom, Building E25 45 Carleton St Cambridge, MA 02142

2:00pm

A-Pops: Transforming Urban Spaces into Learner-directed Playful Learning Environments
A-pops is a networked learning experience that transforms urban spaces into playful and collaborative learning environments that give learners agency of their learning experience and the space itself. Piloted in Mexico City in December 2017, A-pops supports young learners in engaging in emergent and playful opportunities in and beyond their local communities. Popular and underutilized city spaces are embedded with technologies that allow learners to take agency over the space, and collaboratively explore the space’s potential while building their understanding in key domains (e.g. computational thinking). The primary objective of this project is to leverage underutilized central locations in the city to develop learning spaces that are creative, collaborative and public, and that a wide range of learners have the ability to easily and socially engage in transformative learning experiences that set the foundation for future learning in a range of domains.

Speakers
avatar for Jen Groff

Jen Groff

PhD Candidate, MIT Media Lab & MIT Education Arcade


Wednesday August 1, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-372 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

2:00pm

Digital Fabrication in Elementary Schools
In this session, the audience will learn about Elizabeth Forward School District's (K-12 Public School District in Elizabeth, PA) K-12 digital fabrication curriculum, K-5 design challenges, and what software and hardware is appropriate for K-5 students in an elementary FABLab. This session will also explore professional development approaches for elementary teachers and principals on how to implement digital fabrication in an elementary school, how to teach design thinking to K-5 students, how to teach Growth Mindset to K-5 students to help create a FABLab in an elementary school.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Keruskin

Todd Keruskin

Assistant Superintendent, Elizabeth Forward School District
avatar for Mary Carole Perry

Mary Carole Perry

Elementary Principal, Elizabeth Forward School District
K-5 Digital Fabrication Curriculum | 1:1 iPads | Personalized Learning | Remakelearning.com | Makerspaces


Wednesday August 1, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

2:00pm

Ready To Learn With Twin Cities PBS: Science + Literacy Digital Playlists For K-2 Learners
The Twin Cities PBS (TPT) Ready To Learn (RTL) project is a broad and engaging educational media initiative focused on early learning for elementary school children and their families. Funded by a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Education, the program aims to improve the school readiness and academic achievement in science and literacy of children in grades K-2 nationwide. Project content centers on an innovative learning platform featuring thematic playlists comprised of: animated segments from the new PBS Kids television series (based on Aaron Reynold’s New York Times best-selling children’s book Superhero School and available in English and Spanish); complementary live-action videos; digital games, hands-on activities; non-fiction e-books; a digital science notebook for student writing and drawing; and embedded learning analytics and assessment dashboards (and hero themed badging system) that provide feedback to learners, educators, and parents. This approach integrates science and literacy to ignite children’s natural curiosity, engage them as scientists and communicators, and broaden their understanding of how the world works— specifically in life, earth and physical science. Our extensive outreach effort supports program dissemination nationally. Based on TPT’s successful SciGirls model, this train-the-trainer program engages children in tech-integrated informal science learning at libraries, Hispanic-serving organizations, afterschool providers, and community based organizations. Blended professional development workshops prepare educators for effective implementation in their communities. Parent engagement centers on a Family Science App, which encourages collaborative play between children and their parents. Developed using co-design methods, the Family Science App enhances science and literacy learning for children by involving the whole family. This kind of family co-play can help grow academic learning in school and after-school settings. Two playlists (including digital games), the learning platform, and the Family Science App will be in Beta for the Connected Learning Conference.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Freese

Joan Freese

RTL Project Executive Producer, Twin Cities Public Television
Joan Freese is an Emmy Award winning educational technologist at Twin Cities PBS, | in St. Paul, Minnesota, focusing on projects for K-8 students, parents, and educators. | She is digital producer of SciGirls, a transmedia enterprise that encourages tween girls | in STEM, and principle... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Momoko Hayakawa

Dr. Momoko Hayakawa

Ed Research & Analytic Specialist, Twin Cities PBS
Momo Hayakawa is a Education Research and Analytics Associate for the Ready to Learn (RTL) project at Twin Cities PBS (TPT). She oversees RTL’s external evaluation conducted by WestEd and manages the design, implementation, and evaluation of the program. Her research interests... Read More →
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Digital Program Manager, Twin Cities Public Television
Dennis Ramirez is the Digital Program Manager at TPT PBS, and an award winning educational game designer. Dennis is interested in how new technologies are used in, and out, of the classroom to support learning. His main area of research focuses on how failure impacts learning, especially... Read More →


Wednesday August 1, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Whitaker College, E25-111 Classroom, Building E25 45 Carleton St Cambridge, MA 02142

2:30pm

Designing a Better World: Engaging Youth in STEM for Good
Mouse Design League is a diverse team of high school tinkerers and innovators from across New York City public schools who come together weekly over the course of a full school year to design, prototype and build a new technology product that addresses a social need using the Human Centered Design process.
This year, Design League students have been working closely with volunteers with disabilities from Adapt Community Network (formerly United Cerebral Palsy of New York) to prototype new assistive and adaptive technology solutions with the aim of improving the lives of their users.
We would like to present select student assistive technology inventions (ideally, though not necessarily with young people as the presenters) and showcase our Design League program, the student led design process and our digital badging platform along the way. We would also like this project to be considered for a Tech Demo!


Speakers
MM

Maggie Muldoon

Design League Manager, Mouse


Wednesday August 1, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-372 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

2:30pm

Making In Schools: Envisioning and Sustaining Making In Learning
In 2016, the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh and Maker Ed joined together to create Making Spaces: Expanding Making in Schools Across the Nation, which aims to develop a national strategy to sustainably integrate making into schools across the country. The Making Spaces program employs an innovative model where a Regional Hub (such as a school district, library, museum, or community organization) works closely with 5-10 local schools to help jumpstart and sustain maker education in classrooms through crowdfunding, professional development, and community engagement. An accompanying toolkit of resources supports hubs and schools during their 2 years of planning and implementation. In this facilitated hands-on workshop, participants will leverage two of the tools to create concise, vibrant, and compelling visions for their maker-centered learning efforts, spaces, and culture.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Brahms

Lisa Brahms

Director of Learning and Research, Children's Museum of Pittsburgh
Lisa Brahms, Ph.D. is Director of Learning and Research at Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, as well as a visiting researcher with the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out of School Environments (UPCLOSE). Lisa earned her PhD in Learning Sciences and Policy at the... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Chang

Stephanie Chang

Director of Impact, Maker Ed
Stephanie Chang is the Director of Programs at Maker Ed, where she is responsible for overseeing Maker Ed’s program and project offerings, including Maker Corps, Maker VISTA, Making Spaces, Young Makers, and the Open Portfolio Project. She also ensures cohesion between programs... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Penney

Lauren Penney

Program Manager, Making Spaces, Maker Ed


Wednesday August 1, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

2:30pm

Using Tablet Apps and Hands-on Activities to Explore Preschoolers’ Computational Thinking
Public media producers from WGBH and Kentucky Educational Television, and researchers from the Education Development Center (EDC) have teamed up to explore young children’s computational thinking (CT) learning and preschool teachers’ CT understanding as they engage with playful prototype hands-on activities and digital tablet apps. The prototypes leverage a charming group of characters from the new media property Monkeying Around. This Spotlight will walk attendees through the exploratory research and development process: what was learned during prototyping and how these research findings informed the continual development of prototypes that promote the under-investigated area of preschoolers’ CT. Pictures, videos, and engagement with the prototypes themselves will allow for a lively presentation and discussion.

Speakers
ML

Mollie Levin

Digital Production Coordinator, WGBH


Wednesday August 1, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Whitaker College, E25-111 Classroom, Building E25 45 Carleton St Cambridge, MA 02142

3:15pm

Choose your own adventure: Virtual Exchange and Connecting Youth Across Borders

In this hands-on, collaborative workshop, the Stevens Initiative and IREX will lead a discussion on the building blocks of virtual exchange. Our workshop will use interactive learning to explore the problem of increasing access to global communication and technology literacy for youth from under-resourced backgrounds. Virtual exchange – defined as online, international, collaborative learning - can extend access to opportunities for young people to develop essential skills for the global economy when factors such as time, money, and location were once prohibitive.Inclusion in the global economy is essential for stable societies, and increasingly the global job market requires workers to be culturally competent, which includes skills in cross-cultural collaboration, technology, and creativity and problem-solving.

Speakers
MA

Mohammed Abdel-Kader

Executive Director, Aspen Institute Stevens Initiative
AG

Ashley Grimes

Program Officer, IREX


Wednesday August 1, 2018 3:15pm - 3:45pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-372 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

3:15pm

Empowering Girls: The Intersection of Design Thinking and STEAM Activities
Empowering girls in Japan is not an easy task. While other countries have implemented various efforts to promote girls' education, Japan has made little progress in improving the status of women. According to the World Economic Forum, Japan ranks 114th out of 144 countries in gender equality. In order to address this issue, we devised an educational intervention to empower the next generation of girls by employing design thinking to ignite their interests in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics (STEAM) fields. In this session, we explain the rationale for our intervention, describe the content of our curriculum, and share the preliminary results of our program.


Wednesday August 1, 2018 3:15pm - 3:45pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

3:45pm

Board Game for Peace: Integrated Game-Based Learning and Activation Program to Counter Violent Extremism
Board Game for Peace is an integrated game-based learning and activation program targeted youth to strengthen the inclusivity of Indonesian society by promoting tolerant, open, and peaceful religious values through interactive media (board game). The program which currently run in 5 cities in Indonesia: Bandung, Solo, Surabaya, Padang, and Makassar is also designed to enhance public awareness and motivate active participation in order to Counter Violent Extremism (CVE) throughout Indonesia. The whole program is also supported by simple gamification process utilizing the social media platform. The pre and post analyst has shown a significant increment in term of awareness regarding peace values and counter violent extremism movement. Until December 2017 the Board Game for Peace program has reached more than 1700 youth in 5 cities in Indonesia and we expect to reach more than 3000 in March 2018

Speakers
avatar for Eko Nugroho

Eko Nugroho

CEO/Co-Founder, Kummara
Eko is Kummara’s founder and CEO who believes that game is a powerful media that bring positive impact for the society. He also the lead game designer in Kummara and take a role as mentor for all game designer team. Eko also known by his capability of implementing game design approach... Read More →


Wednesday August 1, 2018 3:45pm - 4:15pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-372 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

3:45pm

SciGirls CODE: Connected Learning for Middle School Girls in Out-of-School Time
Funded by the National Science Foundation, SciGirls CODE is a pilot program that seeks to address this situation using the principles of connected learning, a learner-focused, equity driven approach that harnesses the advances and innovations of our connected age to serve learning, with 16 STEM outreach partners nationally to provide 160 girls and their 32 leaders with computational thinking and coding skills. Project implementation, between September 2017–May 2018, includes a 9-month curriculum with 3 strands (Mobile Apps, Robotics, E-Textiles); role model training for female technology professionals; professional development for science, technology engineering and math (STEM) educators; and a research component that investigates the ways computational learning experiences impact the development of computational thinking as well as interest and attitudes toward CS. SciGirls Code will serve as a model for supporting girls’ pursuit of CS in out-of-school time, and is collaboration between Twin Cities PBS (TPT), the National Girls Collaborative, and the University of Minnesota.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Freese

Joan Freese

RTL Project Executive Producer, Twin Cities Public Television
Joan Freese is an Emmy Award winning educational technologist at Twin Cities PBS, | in St. Paul, Minnesota, focusing on projects for K-8 students, parents, and educators. | She is digital producer of SciGirls, a transmedia enterprise that encourages tween girls | in STEM, and principle... Read More →
avatar for Cassie Scharber

Cassie Scharber

Associate Professor of Learning Technologies, University of MN


Wednesday August 1, 2018 3:45pm - 4:15pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

3:45pm

That’s Horse S#!T: Connected Learning Through Compost, Weather Balloons & Other Projects
This spotlight session will feature an overview of one public school district’s work to increased opportunities for students to participate in connected learning experiences. The presentation will showcase four projects that connect students, technology, and community members to make learning engaging and relevant. Examples include:
- a revenue-generating equine composting system,
- a student-designed high altitude balloon launch with video recording
- a Grade 3 PSA that raised awareness & took action to reduce marker landfill waste
- the Nipmuc 21C bi-annual event where students, teachers & community members collaborate to host interest-driven learning seminars.

Presenters will outline how connected learning shapes these and future projects. In closing, the session will highlight the Inspired Learning Project, an open web platform that connects educators via monthly Zoom sessions and a blog to share practices that have led to inspiring learning moments for students.

Speakers
avatar for David Quinn

David Quinn

Director of Tech and Integration, Nipmuc Regional High School
Dave Quinn is the Director of Technology Integration for the Mendon-Upton Regional School District in Massachusetts, and works directly with teachers and students in grades K-12 to reimagine learning experiences through the meaningful use of technology. He is also a candidate in the... Read More →


Wednesday August 1, 2018 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Whitaker College, E25-111 Classroom, Building E25 45 Carleton St Cambridge, MA 02142
 
Thursday, August 2
 

11:00am

How Principles of Play Can Transform Your Research Practice
Play is a powerful means for youth to engage in problem solving, sense-making and learning. But can researchers and practitioners also apply principles of playfulness to the process of evaluation and assessment? This Spotlight features five game-like ways that Convergence Design Lab/Columbia College (Chicago) and Spy Hop (Salt Lake City), a digital media education organization, are conducting participatory action research for assessment, evaluation and audience impact storytelling. Civic Imagination Bingo, Re-capture the Flag, Mentor Identity Hats, Data Therapy and Map Your Journey are fun, dynamic and tested strategies that empower youth media organizations to conduct rigorous evaluation and capture and share their impact story with multiple communities. Presenters will invite participants to join in the play and participate in all the activities.

Speakers
avatar for Margaret Conway

Margaret Conway

Convergence Design Lab
avatar for Mindy Faber

Mindy Faber

Director, Convergence Design Lab
Mindy Faber is the Program Director of Convergence Design Lab, an applied research center and design studio at Columbia College Chicago’s School of Media Arts that partners with organizations to prepare youth to become future-ready, media fluent and active participants in public... Read More →
avatar for Matt Mateus

Matt Mateus

Program Director, Spy Hop
avatar for Adam Sherlock

Adam Sherlock

Community Partnership Director, Spy Hop Productions


Thursday August 2, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Sloan/Morris and Sophie Chang Building, E52-164 Classroom, Building E52 50 Memorial Dr, Cambridge, MA 02142

11:00am

iCivics and Filament Games: A Game-Based-Learning Partnership committed to Innovative Instruction for All Learners
In this session, Dr. Kelly Whitney, Ed.D., iCivics’ Chief Product & Partnerships Officer, and Dan White, Filament Games CEO, will discuss how their focus on purpose, process, practicality, and playability have contributed to the rapid adoption of iCivics’ civic learning games in classrooms, community centers and homes across the country.

Speakers
avatar for Dan White

Dan White

CEO, Filament Games
KW

Kelly Whitney

Chief Product & Partnerships Officer, iCivics


Thursday August 2, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

11:00am

“Help Us Get Rid Of Surveys”: Emerging Findings From Capturing Connected Learning In Libraries
The Capturing Connected Learning in Libraries project addresses the urgent national need for evaluation approaches that reflect new emphases on digital, networked, and production-centered content, spaces, and programming. Libraries need evaluation resources that help develop their connected learning programming and document critical outcomes for youth participants. We have developed and tested instruments that can be used for improving services and demonstrating their value.

In this session, we will share findings from two library evaluations, and discuss how “talk-back boards” have been embraced and adapted to assess connected learning principles and outcomes, and data collected vis-à-vis these tools. For example, preliminary data from one library indicates many of their patrons are brokered into the makerspace by others, and that they come to “hang out” and “mess around.” We will also discuss how this library developed staff capacity for supporting production-centered principles.

Speakers
BP

Bill Penuel

Professor, University of Colorado Boulder
TP

Tim Podkul

Senior Research Scientist, SRI International


Thursday August 2, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Media Lab - E14-240, 2nd Floor, Building E14 75 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

11:30am

Educative Maker Activity Materials for Small Town Librarians to Support Connected Learning
Education settings are increasingly aware of the importance of integrating "Making" and "Connected Learning" activities. Yet images of how these terms would translate for practice in small and rural library settings has been lacking. In response, we have been working for the past two years with public and school libraries to co-develop Maker-oriented programs for small town and rural youth. This spotlight shares findings obtained from observations and interviews across 4 middle school libraries and two public community libraries in a largely rural region and presents a set of educative program materials we have developed and iteratively refined in those library settings. This involves the creation of visual guide materials that could convey what kinds of creative Maker activities were possible, what were essential steps for getting started, and how such an activity could be organized and structured for different library settings.

Speakers
AP

Abigail Phillips

Postdoctoral Fellow, Utah State University


Thursday August 2, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Media Lab - E14-240, 2nd Floor, Building E14 75 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

11:30am

Factitious: Iterative Design, Fake News and Games and Polling Systems
Factitious is game designed as both a polling system and playful education tool. Simply described as tinder for news, players must swipe a news article left or right if they think the article is real news or fake news. In the original 2016 version of the game, only 162 players engaged in the game. In it’s redesign for 2017, more than 1.6 millions players were recorded in the first 3 days it was released.

While most players simply engage in the front end play experience, this open source platform works to do basic A/B testing and polling. The back end of factitious records each session’s answers, time for engagement, and other attributes that prove useful for assessing how people understood the content (time to answer, demographics, etc).

This spotlight illuminates the design process, design goals, and heuristics for launching the relatively successful, low budget project as part of the Knight funded Jolt initiative.

Speakers
LG

Lindsay Grace

Professor, American University Game Lab


Thursday August 2, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

11:30am

When Inquiry Meets Making: Demystifying Inquiry-Based Making using Guided Inquiry Design
Inquiry and maker learning are two powerful approaches to connected learning. The goal of this Spotlight is to discuss how inquiry and making can reinforce each other in K-12 standards-based curriculum. We will introduce our 3-year design-based research, Learning in Libraries: Guided Inquiry Making and Learning in School Libraries, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. This project is a collaborative effort between K-12 school administrators, school librarians, classroom teachers, and university researchers from library and information science and learning sciences in Norman Public Schools and the University of Oklahoma. The project aims to develop a replicable model of inquiry-based making in K-12 standard-based curriculums and assess the learning outcomes. Our hypothesis is guided inquiry instructions coupled with maker learning may have the capacity to dramatically increase student interest, learning, self-regulation, and engagement.

Speakers
XG

Xun Ge

University of Oklahoma, USA
avatar for Kyungwon Koh

Kyungwon Koh

Assistant Professor, The University of Oklahoma


Thursday August 2, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Sloan/Morris and Sophie Chang Building, E52-164 Classroom, Building E52 50 Memorial Dr, Cambridge, MA 02142

2:00pm

Ball State Achievements App
Ball State Achievements is a mobile app for iOS and Android devices that uses gamification to increase engagement and retention of low-income, freshmen students at Ball State University. In the app, students are given hundreds of tasks and goals called achievements. Completing achievements awards students an in-app currency called Bennies-named after Ball State's beloved institutional icon, Beneficence. Students can then use their Bennies to purchase real items from the Ball State Bookstore, Tech Store, and Rec Center from a curated in-app store.

Speakers

Thursday August 2, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

2:00pm

Educator Connected Learning via Collaborative Web Annotation
This spotlight describes a multi-stakeholder partnership that supports educator connected learning via open and collaborative web annotation. The Marginal Syllabus convenes and sustains conversations with K-12 classroom teachers, higher education faculty, and other educators about equity in education using the web annotation platform Hypothes.is. The spotlight will feature stakeholders discussing the project's development, design principles, and the 2018-19 syllabus.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Cantrill

Christina Cantrill

National Programs, National Writing Project
JD

Jeremy Dean

Director of Education, Hypothesis
JD

Joe Dillon

Admin TOSA, Rangeview High School
RK

Remi Kalir

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver
FP

francisco perez

PhD student, University of Colorado Denver


Thursday August 2, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-145 - Lecture Hall, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

2:00pm

Why Do Educational Games Matter? Lessons Learned at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Starting in 2014 the Cornell Lab of Ornithology started developing educational games and digital interactives with the goal of engaging public audiences in new ways. Three games and five interactives on, we have are now in a position to evaluate the impact of these digital experiences collectively and share our findings the digital learning community. This spotlight presentation will briefly introduce the games, describe the communities in which they are used and shared, and explore the ways in which these free digital experiences have changed how we, as a non-profit educational institution, think about public engagement and strategically reach new audiences.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Szuc

Jeff Szuc

Web Designer/Developer, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
avatar for Mya Thompson

Mya Thompson

eLearning Specialist, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Educational games, online learning, instructional design, inquiry-based learning, environmental education, birds, elephants, the deep future...



Thursday August 2, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Media Lab - E14-240, 2nd Floor, Building E14 75 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

2:30pm

A Space To Grow in and a Space to Own: An Online Game-Based Resource For Teachers and By Teachers
In this spotlight, we describe an online resource developed for teachers and populated by teachers learning about game-based learning (GBL) from September 2010-current. We explain the impetus and describe the design of a collaborative space for teachers as they developed a foundation in GBL, explored the role of motivation in engaging learners, grappled with issues of play in the context of participatory cultures and affinity spaces, and became knowledgeable about integrating GBL through a variety of analytical and pedagogical approaches. We will showcase the kinds of games and game-related resources/information teachers posted about. We will also illustrate the discussions that ensued around the posts. In doing so, we will share our reflection on what we learnt about how teachers think about teaching with games and the significance for providing a resource that teachers could grow in, own, and come back to even after their graduated from their Master's program.

Shah, M. & Foster,. A space to grow in and a space to own: An online game-based resource for teachers and by teachers. 

Speakers
avatar for Mamta  Shah

Mamta Shah

Postdoctoral Scholar, Drexel University
Mamta Shah is a postdoctoral scholar of Learning Technologies in the School of Education at Drexel University in Philadelphia, PA. She teaches and conducts research on the theoretical and practical applications of teaching, learning, and assessing with digital environments such as... Read More →


Thursday August 2, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-145 - Lecture Hall, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

2:30pm

Mission Admission: The Evolution of a Digital College Access Initiative at the School Level
Over the past two decades, the Pullias Center for Higher Education at the University of Southern California has conducted research on college access and success. In response to a desire to scale up our outreach efforts and create a dynamic, interactive space for engaging in college preparation, in 2009, our team of researchers partnered with designers from USC’s Game Innovation Lab to create a series of games. For the past three years, we been engaged in research to bring one particular game, Mission: Admission, to scale in California. Following up on our 2016 and 2017 Digital Media and Learning Conference presentations, presenters will highlight the evolution of the Mission: Admission Challenge, illustrating the tension that exists between (1) standardization and customization, (2) scalability and sustainability, and (3) assumptions and the reality of implementing a school-wide digital intervention.

Speakers
TM

Tattiya Maruco

Project Manager, University of Southern California


Thursday August 2, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

2:30pm

Using NGSS to Design Educational Games for Multiple Grade Levels
In this presentation, we describe the development of a cooperative game that aligns with the second grade NGSS disciplinary core idea that "maps show where things are located" and "one can map the shapes and kinds of land and water in any area." Although the topic is considered a second grade NGSS disciplinary core idea, we also attempted to make the game accessible to Kindergartners and First graders, which presented unique design considerations. During this presentation we will share our approach to designing a game for multiple grade levels, and will also provide the results from our alpha test which suggests that the game is both engaging, and developmentally appropriate for multiple age ranges.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Freese

Joan Freese

RTL Project Executive Producer, Twin Cities Public Television
Joan Freese is an Emmy Award winning educational technologist at Twin Cities PBS, | in St. Paul, Minnesota, focusing on projects for K-8 students, parents, and educators. | She is digital producer of SciGirls, a transmedia enterprise that encourages tween girls | in STEM, and principle... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Momoko Hayakawa

Dr. Momoko Hayakawa

Ed Research & Analytic Specialist, Twin Cities PBS
Momo Hayakawa is a Education Research and Analytics Associate for the Ready to Learn (RTL) project at Twin Cities PBS (TPT). She oversees RTL’s external evaluation conducted by WestEd and manages the design, implementation, and evaluation of the program. Her research interests... Read More →
avatar for Dennis Ramirez

Dennis Ramirez

Digital Program Manager, Twin Cities Public Television
Dennis Ramirez is the Digital Program Manager at TPT PBS, and an award winning educational game designer. Dennis is interested in how new technologies are used in, and out, of the classroom to support learning. His main area of research focuses on how failure impacts learning, especially... Read More →


Thursday August 2, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Media Lab - E14-240, 2nd Floor, Building E14 75 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

3:15pm

DiscoverDesign: Digital Artifacts and The Nature of Learning
Design process allows for transparency in assessing student work and understanding. Chicago Architecture Foundation's (CAF) DiscoverDesign.org is a connected learning tool for structuring design process and supporting connected learning. At CAF, design process is used as a means of moving youth from consumers to producers of digital media learning with the help of a structured design process. Real-world design challenges are framed through a web interface enabling students to engage in a design process that is production-centered and interest-driven. The platform is openly networked and academically oriented by enabling teachers to remix existing content for their own classrooms. This has enabled a new wave of community-driven design challenges with an array of digital artifacts that represent student process and 21st century skills development. This spotlight explores the production of digital artifacts and implications for the nature of student work in connected learning contexts.

Speakers
GL

Gabrielle Lyon

Vice President of Education and Experience, Chicago Architecture Foundation
avatar for Edgar "Edge"  Quintanilla

Edgar "Edge" Quintanilla

Digital Manager - DiscoverDesign.org, Chicago Architecture Foundation


Thursday August 2, 2018 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Sloan/Morris and Sophie Chang Building, E52-164 Classroom, Building E52 50 Memorial Dr, Cambridge, MA 02142

3:15pm

Stitching the Loop Curriculum: Making Electronic Textiles in Exploring Computer Science Classrooms
Coding, like the Maker Movement, has a longstanding history of inaccessibility to non-White, non-male students from working-class communities. In order to broaden access to both making and coding, deepen learning in those fields, and promote better diversity in what is being made, we created and implemented an eight-week long formal curricular unit, "Stitching the Loop," which facilitated students' interest-driven electronic textiles projects, supported peer collaboration, and provided equity-minded teaching. In this Spotlight we will share about the iterative development and testing of the curriculum over three years, leading up to its public release in August 2018. Our presentation will highlight key features in designing and implementing the curriculum, which was iteratively designed and tested with increasing numbers of teachers over three years.

Speakers
DF

Deborah Fields

Associate Research Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital technologies... Read More →
JG

Joanna Goode

Associate Professor; Senior Research Scientist, University of Oregon, Education Studies, College of Education
YK

yasmin kafai

Chair, Teaching Learning & Leadership Division, Universityt of Pennsylvania
Yasmin Kafai is Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. She is a researcher, designer, and developer of online communities and tools (ecrafting.org, stitchtfest.org, and scratch.mit.edu) to promote computational participation, crafting, and creativity across K-16. Book publications include Connected Code, Connected Play, The Computer Clubhouse, Textile Messages, and Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat. Kafai earned a doctorate from Harvard University while working wit... Read More →


Thursday August 2, 2018 3:15pm - 3:45pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-145 - Lecture Hall, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

3:15pm

Unhangout for Educators: Best Practices for Participant-Driven Online Workshops
Unhangout for Educators (U4E) is an online professional development program for K-12 educators who are interested in maker education practices. Hosted on an online videoconference platform called Unhangout, U4E has been iteratively designed and conducted as online unconference sessions, where participants actively propose and organize small-group discussions based on their own interests in the topic. Through feedback and observations from a playtest and three workshop iterations conducted so far, we have found that successful participant-driven workshops finely balance intervention and guidance for participants, but also grant them enough autonomy to freely explore their own interests. We will continue iterating the workshop design as well as support strategies to eventually assemble a set of support materials to help teachers and teacher educators create similar types of learning opportunities, particularly focusing on successful facilitation strategies of participant-driven learning as well as respective uses of different breakout styles.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine McConachie

Katherine McConachie

Manager, ML Learning Initiative, MIT Media Lab
Hey there, I'm Katherine! Talk to me about: creative learning; participatory workshop design; online learning communities; university-public library partnerships; design for human values; sewing; crossword puzzles.
YM

Yumiko Murai

Postdoctoral Associate, MIT


Thursday August 2, 2018 3:15pm - 3:45pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

3:45pm

A New Approach to Family Engagement
Research shows that students with engaged families are more likely to do better in school, especially when families are engaging in learning activities at home. A variety of approaches seek to improve learning interactions at home, yet many are based on teacher reminders to families or giving families access to grade books, putting parents in the role of a “compliance officer” with their children. National nonprofit PowerMyLearning recently piloted a new approach called Family Playlists™ that involves families in what their children are learning in school (not as “naggers” but as partners). Family Playlists are interactive homework assignments built on the evidence-base from the Johns Hopkins Teachers Involving Parents in Schoolwork program. They are designed to break down technology and language barriers. The pilot transformed family engagement at a high-poverty school in New York. Given these promising results, PowerMyLearning has begun to make Family Playlists more widely available.


Thursday August 2, 2018 3:45pm - 4:15pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-149 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA 02142

3:45pm

Look Up at the Stars: integrating a user-centered design process into a natural history museum
To be better prepared for the key challenges presented by our new century, the American Museum of Natural History developed an internal skunk works. It focused on tackling how to design interactives to engage visitors with the digital specimens produced and studied by our more than 200 scientists. Using VR, AR and other forms of emerging media, we developed prototypes and tested them with over 1,000 visitors to identify challenges and opportunities for the Museum visit of the future; virtual weevils and sharks cavorted with augmented constellations and moon-scapes. Come learn how we developed the process and what we learned along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Barry Joseph

Barry Joseph

VP of Digital Experience, Girl Scouts
For 18 years, I have been a driving force in both youth development and digital learning. First at Global Kids, a NYC-based after school organization, then at the American Museum of Natural History, I oversaw the design, supervision, and creative visioning for a slate of over 100... Read More →


Thursday August 2, 2018 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Sloan/Morris and Sophie Chang Building, E52-164 Classroom, Building E52 50 Memorial Dr, Cambridge, MA 02142

3:45pm

Music "Making" to Advance STEAM Learning
The Expressive & Creative Interactive Technologies Center (ExCITe) at Drexel University has developed a series of STEAM (STEM + Arts & Design) research and education projects involving novel actuated and robotic instruments. Our Magnetic Resonator Piano has been featured in performances world-wide, and another project, DrumHenge was recently showcased in an installation at the Sundance Film Festival. These projects have informed and been influenced by our STEAM education outreach programs, a integral part of the ExCITe Center’s mission. As we expand the ExCITe Center’s STEAM education programs, we have adapted these music “making” concepts into a curriculum for middle school students. This new curriculum was developed as a 9-week short course for students of the Science Leadership Academy Middle School (SLA-MS), an inquiry-driven learning school. Students use littleBits, a system of electronic building blocks, and K’nex pieces to build their own actuated instruments.

Speakers
avatar for Youngmoo Kim

Youngmoo Kim

Professor and Director, ExCITe Center, Drexel University
Youngmoo Kim is Director of the Expressive & Creative Interaction Technologies (ExCITe) Center and Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Drexel University and Resident Technologist at Opera Philadelphia. He received his Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab and also... Read More →
BM

Brandon Morton

Project Director of Civic Technology, Drexel ExCITe Center


Thursday August 2, 2018 3:45pm - 4:15pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-145 - Lecture Hall, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA
 
Friday, August 3
 

11:00am

GeoConvos: Exploring Embodiment in Connected Learning
In this workshop session, we propose to engage session participants in exploring the interrelationships between connected learning and embodied learning through interactive engagements in GeoConvos-- place-based activities we have developed over the last four years. During and after engaging in these activities, session attendees will critically reflect on their own participation and on ways they can implement these activities in teaching and learning in their own connected learning contexts. End-of-session reflection will focus on better understanding embodied learning in the design, implementation, and assessment of connected learning environments.

Speakers
avatar for David Bild

David Bild

Coordinator, Teen and Young Adult Programs, Chicago Academy of Sciences / Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum
IB

Ilana Bruton

Public Programs Manager, Chicago History Museum
avatar for Jaclyn Carmichael

Jaclyn Carmichael

Program Director, Project Exploration
avatar for Virginia Killian Lund

Virginia Killian Lund

PhD Candidate, University of Illinois at Chicago
I'm interested in young people's composing processes with media, and with the communities and practices that support their work.
avatar for Nathan Phillips

Nathan Phillips

Assistant Professor, UIC College of Education
AS

Ani Schmidt

Public Programs Coordinator, Chicago History Museum


Friday August 3, 2018 11:00am - 11:30am
Sloan/Morris and Sophie Chang Building, E52-164 Classroom, Building E52 50 Memorial Dr, Cambridge, MA 02142

11:00am

Large Scale EdTech Interventions in Resource Constrained Contexts
The Connected Learning Initiative in India
Kirky DeLong, Eric Klopfer, Vijay Kumar, Judy Perry

The Connected Learning Initiative (CLIx) is an innovative collaboration led by the Tata Trusts, the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that is built upon the theme of connection—connecting students and teachers to authentic learning experiences and contemporary teaching and learning practices, connecting teachers with teachers in learning communities, and connecting technology enabled curriculum with the infrastructure in schools and states. CLIx addresses three intersecting lenses simultaneously across four independent states within India in grades 8 and 9: the design, development and delivery of connected OER learning experiences (along with open source tools and platforms); a systematic process of implementing a large-scale educational innovation across states and schools; and professional development to transform teacher practice.

Speakers
KD

Kirky DeLong

Assistant Director, Special Projects, MIT Open Learning, J-WEL Research & Projects
EK

Eric Klopfer

Professor, MIT STEP/TEA
Dr. Eric Klopfer is Professor and Director of the Scheller Teacher Education Program and The Education Arcade at MIT. Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems. His research explores... Read More →
avatar for Judy Perry

Judy Perry

Cambridge, MA, United States, Scheller Teacher Ed Program
Judy currently oversees design, development and research for several projects involving games and simulations for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. Her research interests include location-based games and ubiquitous “casual” games. When she is not making or playing... Read More →


Friday August 3, 2018 11:00am - 12:00pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-372 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

11:30am

Coding for All: Connecting with Diverse Youth Interests
This Spotlight session will focus on Coding for All, an initiative to develop interest-based entry points into coding, particularly for girls and youth of color. The collaboration was initiated by the MIT Media Lab, the Digital Media and Learning Hub at University of California Irvine, and Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. The project builds on the Scratch coding language and online community, where young people create interactive stories, games, and animations based on their interests. Coding for All offers new tools and activities designed to connect with the diverse interests of youth who otherwise may not become engaged in coding. Workshops engage librarians and community center staff in learning to offer these experiences for youth in their communities. Researchers have examined youth participation in Scratch and other youth-driven learning communities. The presenters will discuss what they have learned from the perspective of designing for equity.

Speakers
avatar for Mizuko Ito

Mizuko Ito

Director, Connected Learning Lab
avatar for Natalie Rusk

Natalie Rusk

Research Scientist, MIT Media Lab
avatar for Moran Tsur

Moran Tsur

Learning Developer, BrainPOP


Friday August 3, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Sloan/Morris and Sophie Chang Building, E52-164 Classroom, Building E52 50 Memorial Dr, Cambridge, MA 02142

11:30am

Tools for Computational Action: New Features in MIT App Inventor
MIT App Inventor has begun to frame its work in a theory of computational action: the idea that youth should learn about, and create with, computing in ways that provide them the opportunity to have direct impact in their lives and their communities. The App Inventor team is developing new features that allow students to more easily engage with authentic problems in their own lives with computational solutions. These features- maps, real-time collaboration, and support for Internet of Things applications, are powerful tools that students can bring to bear with minimal computing background in order to solve specific, local problems.

Speakers
JS

Josh Sheldon

Associate Director, MIT App Inventor
avatar for Mark Sherman

Mark Sherman

Postdoctoral Research Associate, MIT
MT

Mike Tissenbaum

Research Scientist, MIT



Friday August 3, 2018 11:30am - 12:00pm
Media Lab - E14-240, 2nd Floor, Building E14 75 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

1:30pm

Designing Biomimetic Robots in Middle School
The goal of Designing Biomimetic Robots is to develop and study an education program that integrates science, engineering, and computing by engaging students in biomimicry design challenges. Middle school students will study how animals and plants accomplish different tasks, and engineer a robot inspired by what they learned. Our design goal is to create an interdisciplinary learning environment for students. This submission describes the project's design conjectures (Sandoval, 2014), including the embodiments and mediating processes that guide our design work. We also describe some persistent design challenges we are confronting, including: (i) How can we maximize possibilities for student agency and creativity while providing sufficient constraints and support materials? (ii) How can we maximize biomimetic elements in the engineering solution? (iii) How can student documentation support engineering practice and interdisciplinary thinking?

Speakers
avatar for Debra Bernstein

Debra Bernstein

Senior Research Associate, TERC
Debra Bernstein is a Senior Researcher at TERC. In her research and evaluation work shestudies STEM learning in K-12 and informal environments, with an emphasis on approaches thatincrease CS engagement and learning to broaden participation of diverse and underservedaudiences. Debra... Read More →
avatar for Gillian  Puttick

Gillian Puttick

Senior Scientist, TERC
Research on youth-created games to learn science, curriculum design about climate change for middle and/or high school; high school students using Smart Cities data to learn about their communities


Friday August 3, 2018 1:30pm - 2:00pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-372 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

1:30pm

FemTechSonic: Playlists of Global Collaboration + Connected Learning
FemTechSonic is an online multimodal plug-n-play pedagogical platform with iterative playlists for collaborative critical making and mapping of media; our vision is for this work to represent our own system of global collaboration and connected learning that serves lineages of intersectional feminists and technologists, teachers and learners in a variety of learning environments, including universities, community organizations, youth centers, adult education, and others. The first set of playlist themes are: Games, Sound, and Location. Each playlist contains a media piece (podcast, digital game, or other media), links to readings, discussion questions, and an activity, such as cooking recipes and dance videos. These playlists act as invitations for learners to create and share their own critical making responses to curated materials on our platform.

Speakers
avatar for Alexandrina Agloro

Alexandrina Agloro

Futurist for the Latinx Pacific Archive/ Ford Postdoctoral Fellow in Media Studies/ doula & curandera
avatar for George Hoagland

George Hoagland

Visiting Faculty, Minneapolis College of Art & Design
[pronouns: he/she/they] I do QTIPOCI studies, new media studies, and old-fashioned humanities. I love goal-oriented meetings and task-based deadlines. Huge fan of safety, civics, and growing things. Not into snakes, spiders, and single-use packaging. Ask me to do your colors (I'm... Read More →
KH

Kristy H.A. Kang

Assistant Professor, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
avatar for Veronica Paredes

Veronica Paredes

Assistant Professor, FemTechNet / UCLA


Friday August 3, 2018 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Sloan/Morris and Sophie Chang Building, E52-164 Classroom, Building E52 50 Memorial Dr, Cambridge, MA 02142

1:30pm

Making and Using Games for Teen Thriving: A Multidisciplinary, Participatory Approach
This Spotlight will feature iThrive Games’ unique multidisciplinary approach to designing and using games in the best interest of teens. Games are an engaging and safe space in which teens can explore and experiment, practice skills, and make the most of their innate curiosity and drive to understand themselves and the world they will one day run. Too few games currently exist specifically to: support teens’ unique social and emotional needs; reflect their varied experiences and interests; and empower them to build the strengths they need to thrive. Our nonprofit organization addresses that gap by collaborating across disciplines to intentionally design and use games to support teens’ healthy development. Our approach involves designing directly with teens and collaborating with scientists in learning and teen development and game developers across several key initiatives. This method has resulted in a growing portfolio of games, products, and programs to support teen thriving.

Speakers

Friday August 3, 2018 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Media Lab - E14-240, 2nd Floor, Building E14 75 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

2:00pm

Let Me Help You Learn from My Meal: User-Generated Meal Photos as a Benchmark for Nutritional Estimation
Healthy eating often depends on individuals’ nutritional knowledge and their ability to quickly gauge nutritional composition of meals. However, both of these tasks present considerable challenge, and computing tools meant to assist in these tasks continue to be cumbersome and labor-intensive. In a pilot study, we investigated the potential of promoting nutritional literacy with social computing platforms by helping individuals compare their own meals with meals captured by others. We compared this holistic comparison approach with a more traditional method that requires mental decomposition of a meal into ingredients and estimating their portion sizes in a controlled experiment with crowd workers on Amazon Mechanical Turk. Based on the results of this study, we have identified new approaches for incorporating socially generated data, crowdsourced evaluations, and gameful components into smartphone apps to increase engagement and fun.

Speakers
MH

Maria Hwang

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Columbia University Medical Center


Friday August 3, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Media Lab - E14-240, 2nd Floor, Building E14 75 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA

2:00pm

Participating in Literacies and Computer Science (PiLaCS): An Approach to Computing Ed with Emergent Bilinguals
Just as learning to use a new language is more than memorizing verb conjugations and vocabulary, being computationally literate is more than ordering the keywords of a programming language with the correct syntax. It is about participating in communities that create, read, modify, and use code and computing for particular purposes and contexts (Kafai & Burke, 2014). In this spotlight, practitioners and researchers who are integrating computer science into K-12 bilingual classrooms will describe an approach to teaching and learning computational literacies that considers how language-learning and in particular, learning literacies with and through language, may provide clues for supporting K-12 students’ participation in computing education. We will also describe some examples from classroom practice that demonstrate this philosophy in action.

Speakers

Friday August 3, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm
MIT Tang Center, E51-372 - Classroom, Building E51 2 Amherst St, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA